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Exciting progress in Artificial Intelligence – Joscha Bach

Joscha Bach discusses progress made in AI so far, what’s missing in AI, and the conceptual progress needed to achieve the grand goals of AI.
Discussion points:
0:07 What is intelligence? Intelligence as the ability to be effective over a wide range of environments
0:37 Intelligence vs smartness – interesting models vs intelligent behavior
1:08 Models vs behaviors – i.e. Deepmind – solving goals over a wide range of environments
1:44 Starting from a blank slate – how does an AI see an Atari Game compared to a human? Pac Man analogy
3:31 Getting the narrative right as well as the details
3:54 Media fear mongering about AI
4:43 Progress in AI – how revolutionary are the ideas behind the AI that led to commercial success? There is a need for more conceptual progress in AI
5:04 Mental representations require probabilistic algorithms – to make further progress we probably need different means of functional approximation
5:33 Many of the new theories in AI are currently not deployed – we can assume a tremendous shift in every day use of technology in the future because of this
6:07 It’s an exciting time to be an AI researcher

 

Principles of Synthetic Intelligence - Joscha BachJoscha Bach, Ph.D. is an AI researcher who worked and published about cognitive architectures, mental representation, emotion, social modeling, and multi-agent systems. He earned his Ph.D. in cognitive science from the University of Osnabrück, Germany, and has built computational models of motivated decision making, perception, categorization, and concept-formation. He is especially interested in the philosophy of AI and in the augmentation of the human mind.

Joscha has taught computer science, AI, and cognitive science at the Humboldt-University of Berlin and the Institute for Cognitive Science at Osnabrück. His book “Principles of Synthetic Intelligence” (Oxford University Press) is available on amazon.

 

Juergen Schmidhuber on DeepMind, AlphaGo & Progress in AI

In asking AI researcher Juergen Schmidhuber about his thoughts on progress at DeepMind and about the AlphaGo vs Lee Sedol Go tournament – provided some initial comments. I will be updating this post with further interview.

juergen288x466genova1Juergen Schmidhuber: First of all, I am happy about DeepMind’s success, also because the company is heavily influenced by my former students: 2 of DeepMind’s first 4 members and their first PhDs in AI came from my lab, one of them co-founder, one of them first employee. (Other ex-PhD students of mine joined DeepMind later, including a co-author of our first paper on Atari-Go in 2010.)

Go is a board game where the Markov assumption holds: in principle, the current input (the board state) conveys all the information needed to determine an optimal next move (no need to consider the history of previous states). That is, the game can be tackled by traditional reinforcement learning (RL), a bit like 2 decades ago, when Tesauro used RL to learn from scratch a backgammon player on the level of the human world champion (1994). Today, however, we are greatly profiting from the fact that computers are at least 10,000 times faster per dollar.

In the last few years, automatic Go players have greatly improved. To learn a good Go player, DeepMind’s system combines several traditional methods such as supervised learning (from human experts) and RL based on Monte Carlo Tree Search. It will be very interesting to see the system play against the best human Go player Lee Sedol in the near future.

Unfortunately, however, the Markov condition does not hold in realistic real world scenarios. That’s why games such as football are much harder for machines than Go, and why Artificial General Intelligence (AGI) for RL robots living in partially observable environments will need more sophisticated learning algorithms, e.g., RL for recurrent neural networks.

For a comprehensive history of deep RL, see Section 6 of my survey with 888 references:
http://people.idsia.ch/~juergen/deep-learning-overview.html

Also worth seeing Juergen’s AMA here.

Juergen Schmidhuber’s website.